Is-email-marketing-dead

Is Email Marketing Dead?

Email marketing has been around for quite a while. 50 years to be exact. Which, as far as the internet is concerned, makes email positively ancient. But does that mean email is dead?

Email has defied the odds. In fact, we are all a bit email mad. 3.9 billion people are using email and millennials peek into their inbox every few hours. 95% of baby boomers regularly check their email too and if you’re in the market for some great word-of-mouth marketing, baby boomers are your go-to demographic. They are 19% more likely to share content they enjoyed.

People want choice
People want to choose what they see. 77% of people prefer email as a form of permission-based advertising. They appreciate the fact that they have elected to be marketed to by your brand and not having your products or services forced into their day. One of the greatest aspects of email marketing software is that it provides real-time data on how your emails are performing. Therefore you can see how many opened your email and how many people engaged to ensure your content remains relevant.

Some key tips:

  • Include the customer’s name in the email.
  • Focus on that subject line – make it friendly and captivating for readers.
  • Use behaviour-triggered emails, if a subscriber has gone a bit quiet why not send them a reminder email that you’re there?
  • Ask for reviews and feedback, give your audience the opportunity to interact with you and gain some quality insight along the way.

The 50 word rule
The average attention for an email is only 13 seconds. That means that you have roughly only 50 words to work with. But fear not, make your email come to life using video, imagery, colour and graphics to keep your readers engaged. And use movement and design to inspire your audience to explore your brand a little more.

Email marketing is here to stay and remains one of the greatest tools in any marketer’s tool kit. Email isn’t dead, it’s just different.

Do you need help with your email marketing?

Source: Wirelab [abridged]